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Constitution Ratification

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The Constitution is important to ratify because it sets laws and principles that establish the function, nature, offices, powers, and limits of an organization such as a government, or charity. It also protects the rights of people, and of the states, by telling government what it cannot do. Even though the Articles of Confederation did not work out the way it was planned, the Constitution is an improved, fixed Articles of Confederation. The Constitution will improve our country and government. This will be done in several ways. First, it is said that there will be a checks and balances. What that is – is the Three Branches of Government will never over-power each other. The Legislative checks Executive and Judicial (They can overturn a veto with certain amount of votes and appoint lower courts), Executive checks Legislative and Judicial (They can veto a bill and appoint Supreme Court justices), and lastly Judicial checks Legislative and executive by declaring something unconstitutional. Checks and Balances are great so the President will never get too powerful and not one branch can be overturned and become infused with power.
Of course the Founding Fathers had to include individual rights/freedoms. First, it sets up a fair form of government. In other words the government, by law is required to give individuals freedom of speech, religion, and press. Second, it sets up rules for which the government to work by creating boundaries for state government laws and federal government laws. Third, the Bill of Rights outlines our freedom in the first ten amendments to the Constitution. The Constitution is one of the cornerstones of this country as it relates to our rights as Americans. It needs to be protected at all costs. It is too important a document not to be protected.
For all the entrepreneurs, whether it will be a small, family owned business or a…...

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