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Development of Modern Prison

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ROLE OF LABOUR DISCIPLINE, TIME AND SPACE IN THE FORMATION OF MODERN PRISON

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Role of Labour Discipline, Time and Space in the Formation of Modern Prison.
The jail system began on seventeenth century. It was during this time that the outcasts in the society including the homeless and the poor were segregated and they were enclosed in a particular place on their own (Matthews 2009, 20). This was either done for a period after which they were taken back or it was done permanently where they were supposed to remain on their own forever. This was realised later that it could also act as a form of punishment to those who were identified with general misconduct. There was a shift on the punishment where people stopped giving corporal punishment which included public executions, whipping or shaming which were commonly used to new methods that involved locking out the criminals out of the society on their own. This evolved as a form of punishment where offenders would be deprived their liberty for a specified period.
Role of Time
The most recent type of crime activity to have developed in UK and all across Europe is the phenomenon of gang activities. Gang activities are believed to have increased especially due to the fact that the crime has been ignored for a long period. However, the olden theories about the origin of the gangs and the sources the gangs acquire their power have been found to be misleading. It has been established that the gang talk has been propagated by the media as more people especially in the younger generation being recruited in to the gangs (Hallsworth and Young, 2008, pp. 175). The new members become new threats to the society as they are bound to live on the gangs forever.
Back on those times, hanging was the most common punishment. People would gather at particular places…...

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