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How World War Ii Changed the Roles of Women

In: Social Issues

Submitted By livinginoblivion
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World War II can be seen as a watershed in changing the roles of women because for the first time, women were encouraged to take on roles that society previously pressured them out of. In order to win the war, our nation needed full effort and cooperation from every citizen. This meant convincing women to act on their duty and become employed, after they had been discouraged from the workforce for so long. Instead of just filling stereotypical female jobs, such as clerks or receptionists, women became managers, lumberjacks, shipbuilders, and plumbers. Not only did these opportunities allow for women to get higher pay, they were also beneficial in changing the judgmental attitude many women faced. Because of the desperation to flourish during this time, there was little room left for discrimination of age, marital status, or race. Most importantly, the pressure a woman had to fulfill the housewife and mother role dissolved. Now the act of leaving a child at daycare to hold a job was praised (Lindsey, 2015).
Unfortunately when the war ended, women were expected to return to their domestic roles and leave the labor force. However, many women kept their sense of independence and were keen to make a change. Although men once again monopolized employment opportunities, the blatant evidence that employed women thrived could not be erased. It became difficult for the media and society to convince women that their proper place was in the home, when the contrary had been proven (Lindsey, 2015).

Lindsey, Linda L. (2015). Gender Roles: A Sociological Perspective. Boston, Massachusetts:…...

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