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Latinos and End-of Life Choices

In: Social Issues

Submitted By BlessedIAM
Words 727
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Identify the cultural/ethnic group you have selected
The ethnic group that I have selected for my discussion is the Latino people.
Summarize significant findings about this group that inform attitudes and preferences around end-of-life care
Generally, Latinos often have a strong belief that living with uncertainty is an essential part of life. This mindset shows in their health beliefs and behaviors in major ways. Latino patients are more likely to believe that having a chronic disease like cancer is a death sentence. They may prefer not to know if they have cancer, and may believe that cancer is a punishment from God .Due to their mindset, Latino patients may be less likely to pursue preventive screenings and may even delay visiting a doctor until symptoms become severe. They may avoid effective therapies for cancer and other chronic diseases, especially radical new treatments and invasive procedures (Cateret, n.d).
What are the challenges in ensuring those patients (or their surrogates) understand their rights and that their consent is truly informed? The article “Whenever We Prayed, She Wept,” shares the experience of Ms. C, a woman from Central America, who was diagnosed with an acute form of leukemia during her 34th week of pregnancy. Fortunately, she was able to deliver a healthy baby girl, receive chemotherapy after delivery and go into remission. Unfortunately, six months after being in remission, she had a relapse and the cancer resurfaced (Smith et al , 2009).Before being hospitalized, Ms. C lived with Mr. M and allowed him to make medical decisions for her, even though she had not legally appointed him or anyone else her health care proxy. Based on the prognosis after her treatments, the oncology team had a discussion with Ms. C, who spoke only Spanish and she made her own decision to sign a do-not-resuscitate–do-not-intubate (DNR/DNI) order…...

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