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Law and Morality

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Law and Morality
It is possible that law and morality in many ways are interrelated. Law is essentially a set of rules provided by the government to mediate our behaviour and to ensure our society lives harmoniously. These rules must be complied with, as failure to do so will result in penalties or sentences against the deviants. These laws can be implemented immediately through statute and can provide guidelines for future cases.
In contrast with law, morality is less of a collective sentiment and rather more an individual set of values and beliefs. These can vary from person to person and as opposed to laws that are enforceable immediately, morals take many years or even decades to adapt and become something that various groups may follow as a whole. Morals are not in themselves law and while they may hold social stigma in the perspective of other social groups, it is up to the individual to follow them.
Law and morality have a variety of differences that make it slightly harder to establish a clear relationship between the two. As stated earlier, law is largely created externally and is a way of regulating human action/behaviour. Morality is concerned with the motives of an individual and can be unique to each member of society, meaning they will behave in a different way compared to another person who holds different morals. In this sense, morality promotes individuality as opposed to law that is enforced on the entire population alike. Disputes that may arise over legal issues can be resolved as a result of statutes and precedents available to the government-these cannot be argued with. However, this is not the same with morality, as there is no set view as to what is right or wrong, nor is there a way to settle moral issues, as these have been developed over thousands of years so social groups promoting these morals are unlikely to be dissuaded.
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