Free Essay

National Labor Relations Board and Social Media Policies

In: Business and Management

Submitted By nasibaaccount
Words 2926
Pages 12
Student:XXX
Professor:XXX

National Labor Relations Board and Social Media Policies National Labor Relations Board has been an important federal agency that administers and enforces the National Labor Relations Act of 1935, being and important middleman in relationship between employers and employees. The area of our interest is section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (29 U.S.C. §157) that permits employees to engage in so called "protected concerted activity” and the recent changes that needed to be brought in order for the Act to catch up with modern day technology advances. Internet has penetrated our lives and social networks started to play an important role in our daily communication. As with everything else, employment and issues associated with it are often being discussed between employees. Reasonably, there is a number of concerns regarding this particular type of online activity and NLRB had to step in in order to clarify its standing regarding these concerns and provide social network communication policies. Social networks like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn have become the central communication arena for various companies’ employees and social media policies were established by various employers in order to limit what and how can be expressed when communicating online. The idea is to discourage potential discussions that portray the company in a negative way. Employers also don’t want their employees to disparage anything that is company-related. Very often violation of these policies led to firing of those who engaged in the aforementioned online activity. NLRB has ruled, however, that these policies restrict workers’ right to discuss work conditions freely and without fear of retribution. In essence, NLRB sees no difference between the online part and the offline parts of discussion, if the topic falls under NLRB regulatory activities.
Major companies like Enterprise-Rent-A-Car and Wal-Mart had to rewrite their policies regarding social media communication in order to avoid violating the new rules NLRB created regarding communicating through platforms like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, updating traditional rules to a new technology. In doing so, they were advised to be more specific in what they restrict from communicating. For example, in a ruling on September 7th of 2012, NLRB rejected Costco’s restriction to post anything that “damages the company or any person’s reputation” as overly broad. In doing so, the Board explained that if this policy is taken to the offline world, then it would limit Costco’s employees right to free speech under the Act. On the other hand, looking at Wal-Mart social media policies, NLRB approved Wal-Mart’s prohibition of “inappropriate postings that may include discriminatory remarks, harassment and threats of violence or similar inappropriate or unlawful conduct.”
There are different standards that NLRB uses when resolving issues related to workers’ communication through social media. For example, NLRB has found it permissible for an employer to act against a lone worker ranting on the Internet. There is a number of guidelines that will make it easier for companies in adapting to NLRB’s social media policies. First of all, NLRB does not like when unions or attempts to unionize are restricted and puts such cases under particular scrutiny. The biggest reason is because unions are the heart of NLRB, providing necessary lobbying support for the Board in the U.S. Congress. Opinions are also under strict protections, even if factually incorrect. As long as they are relevant to working conditions and wages. Generic and overly broad “courtesy” clauses aren’t welcome either. As mentioned before, in practicality, NLRB wants online discussions to enjoy the same level of protection as communication via traditional ways. Thus, allowing broader clauses poses serious risk for a company of any caliber. There is also certain degree of risk when restricting employees’ ability to be interviewed in an unauthorized fashion, or when doing it outside to third parties. NLRB upheld a clause that prohibits “bad mouthing” by employees, however. On the other hand, employers are allowed to prohibit employees’ personal grievances and rants online. As long as limitations do not discourage protected speech, they don’t violate the Act. Then there are company marks - they may be prohibited from commercial use. Thus, an employee can still use the mark for non-commercial use like work related discussions or labor related activities. Savings clause would be a helpful tool, but will not save, if other serious violations are found. Narrowly tailored confidentiality clauses are also acceptable, however wages, workplace conditions and employee or company performance are not allowed to be completely restricted from discussion online. Lastly, the language used when setting up a company policies plays an important role, since most provisions NLRB considered unfair to employees were written as “absolutes” or “mandates”. A company can still enforce important aspects of workplace environment like prohibiting sexual harassment, dealing with workplace violence, sabotage or abusing activity. Below is a number of cases that will help to understand the NLRB standing on the challenging issues that Social Media has created, since these technology tools did not exist in 1935 at the time the major part of today’s labor law was enacted. Cases related to social media have been taking place for quite a while, but in a famous “Facebook firing” case of NLRB v. American Medical Response of Connecticut Inc., NLRB No. 34-CA-12576, the Board sided with an employee for the first time. Dawnmarie Souza was an employee of American Medical Response. She requested union representation, when asked by her supervisor to prepare an incident report concerning a customer complaint about her work. Refusing union representation was the biggest misstep at this point and justified what and how the employee said regarding the supervisor on Facebook at a later time. American Medical Response suspended and later fired Ms. Souza for violating the company’s policies with regards to heated discussion on Facebook that followed the incident. Although her supervisor was referred as “scumbag” and “dick”, which violated American Medical Response’s Internet policy of that time, NLRB concluded that the discussion must be viewed as “protected, concerted activity”, since it was about working conditions. Also, there was no assault or battery involved. In NLRB v. American Medical Response the parties did not go to court and the case was settled where American Medical Response agreed to revise its policies and be more specific in restricting online activities, rather than provide a blanket-type limits on what their employees can discuss on Facebook or Twitter. Granting union representation to its employees was another part of the settlement as well. Lastly, American Medical Response also settled with Ms. Souza as well.
In Hispanics United of Buffalo, Inc., 359 NLRB No. 37 (Dec. 14, 2012), NLRB ruled that Hispanics United of Buffalo, a non-profit social services organization, unlawfully terminated Mariana Cole-Rivera, one its employees. This happened after she posted a Facebook message asking how her fellow co-workers felt about another caseworker’s threat to complain to the boss about their not working hard enough. The social services provider fired Ms. Cole-Riviera and four other employees, whose heated comments were perceived as violation of the organization’s harassment policies, where the caseworker who complained was treated as a victim. NLRB did not agree and saw the fired employees’ actions as protected concerted activity even though there was no clear indication the employees were contemplating group action of any kind and ordered reinstatement of employees fired over the heated discussion on Facebook. In these cases, the Board explained that an activity is concerted when an employee acts “with or on the authority of other employees, and not solely by and on behalf of the employee himself.”
One would think that after decisions like this employees are given carte blanche and can post and discuss anything about their employers and their products in whatever way they find it appropriate. There is a fine line, however. It is demonstrated in Karl Knauz Motors, Inc. d/b/a/ Knauz BMW and Robert Becker, No 13-CA-046452. NLRB was considering two sub-cases at this time, when Robert Becker, a BMW salesman made Facebook posts on two occasions. First one involved a Land Rover accident on a dealership lot across the street, where the dealership was also part or Knauz Group. The second posting was related to a company event about which Mr. Becker and other salesmen were not happy, particularly about the “cheap” catering part, where hot dogs and cookies along with bottles of water were served to high-end clientele. The employees were concerned about how it would poorly reflect on their sales and, of course, commission. Mr. Becker was fired when Knauz Group management learned about the posts, which portrayed the company in negative light. NLRB ruled in favor of the company. To understand the reason, one needs to become familiar with two important tests.
When applying traditional rules to Social Media communication, NLRB often invokes two important cases - Atlantic Steel, 245 NLRB 814, 816-817 (1979) and NLRB v. Electrical Workers Local 1229 (Jefferson Standard), 346 U.S. 464 (1953) in order to validate the protection of the online activity of an employee. The first test is normally applied to an employee who made public outbursts against a supervisor. The second test becomes relevant when and employer or its products are subject of disparaging comments to outside or third parties. While Mr. Becker’s second posting on Facebook was considered protected concerted activity, the posting about Land Rover accident was neither protected nor concerted activity subject to protection under the Act, which Kaiser Group asserted was actual reason for Becker’s termination. However, the Administrative Law Judge found that the employer’s policy was too broad and could discourage protected activity because it prohibited employees from giving “unauthorized interviews ”to third parties and stated (in a separate clause) that “no one should be disrespectful or use profanity or any other language which injures the image or reputation of the Dealership.” Despite being content with the ruling, Kaiser Group voiced their concerns about being more confused regarding NLRB social media guidelines after the decision was made.
“Personal Venting” is not considered protected or concerted activity and thus, there is no justification for using Social Media for this purposes. JT's Porch Saloon & Eatery Ltd., NRLB Div. of Adv. No. 13-CA-46689 (July 7, 2011) clearly demonstrates the case. While not being happy with tip distribution policy and not having had any raise in five year, a bartender in suburban Chicago restaurant started calling his customers “rednecks”, and expressed his “hope that they would choke on the glass as they drove home drunk”. This had nothing to do with a discussion aimed at improving working conditions or wages - thus no protection was available for these postings under the Act. Colleagues did not support his actions and he had not approached the management to resolve the issue either.
Many people have perception that NLRB is an organization backed by unions. The ruling in MRC Carpenters Union Local 2012 (Forcine Concrete & Construction Co., Inc.), 358 NLRB No. 39 (May 15, 2012) serves as an example of a very relevant case for this perception.
Four union employees entered a construction site where non-unionized workers were performing their jobs. Without introducing themselves and impersonating inspectors they started interrogating those on-site. The process was evidently coercive, as immigrant non-unionized workers tried to avoid the “inspection”, but were forced to carry on. The “inspectors” demanded ID’s and inquired about immigration status - the weak spot of many immigrant non-unionized workers. One of the union members was recording the process all the time. The video was later sent to immigration authorities and was posted on YouTube in an edited format.
In its ruling Administrative Law Judge stated that the union’s interrogations did not engage in unfair labor practices affecting commerce within meaning of Section 8(b)(1)(A) and Section 2(6) and (7) of the Act. The Board confirmed the decision made by the Administrative Law Judge. The fact that non-unionized employees were threatened, were recorded without permission and that the video was posted online for third parties to view was somehow not relevant. It would be relevant to mention, however, that there is a number of voices in right to work states that see NRRB’s new rules constitute a way to increase the Board’s influence. This is because unions, the main power behind NLRB, have dwindled in numbers and have recently lost a number of important battles after the economic crisis of 2008. There is close scrutiny when NLRB considers each case. This can be observed when comparing two complaints filed with the Board. In Rock Creek Veterinary Hospital, NLRB No 36-CA-10824 and Build.com, NLRB 20-CA-035444 each company fined one of their employees for negative postings on Facebook. In the case with veterinary hospital, the posting resulted in responses from three co-workers who agreed with her and expressed their reservations about the situation in a follow-up discussion. NLRB ruled the firing to be unlawful. In the home improvement online retailer case the scenario was quite similar, however this time NLRB decided to be on be on the employer’s side, because the discharged party “had no particular audience in mind when she made that post, the post contained no language suggesting that she sought to initiate or induce co-workers to engage in group action, and the post did not grow out of a prior discussion about terms and conditions of employment with her co-workers.” NLRB deemed the posting “personal gripes”, which do not fall under the Act protection in this case. At the same time, the company had to re-write its policy and take limitations that were violating the Act off the list. This included an agreement to post a notice at the workplace for 60 days stating that employees have the right to post comments about terms and conditions of employment on their social media pages, and that they will not be terminated or otherwise punished for such conduct. On many occasions NLRB would intervene to adjust or invalidate a company’s social media policy. The reason it happens is because they are too broad and in reality employees are limited in what they can discuss online. Section 7 of the NLRA (29 U.S.C. § 157) is what the Board wants to be free from restrictions, no matter if the “cafeteria” is online or offline. NLRB uses two cases to judge on how viable a company’s social media policy is. An employer violates Section 8(a)(1) through the maintenance of a work rule if that rule “would reasonably tend to chill employees in the exercise of their Section 7 rights, referring to Lafayette Park Hotel, 326 NLRB 824, 825 (1998), enfd. 203 F.3d 52 (D.C. Cir. 1999). The Board also uses a two- step inquiry to determine if a work rule would have such an effect. Lutheran Heritage Village–Livonia, 343 NLRB 646, 647 (2004). First, a rule is clearly unlawful if it explicitly restricts Section 7 protected activities. If the rule does not explicitly restrict protected activities, it will only violate Section 8(a)(1) upon a showing that:(1) employees would reasonably construe the language to prohibit Section 7 activity; (2) the rule was promulgated in response to union activity; or (3) the rule has been applied to restrict the exercise of Section 7 rights. As it can be seen, most complaints regarding social media filed with NLRB are centered around two categories: employees that challenge the firing from a company and employees that dispute their employer’s social media policies. It is hard to strike the right balance, when a company institutes social media policy. The nature of online communication suggests that the employees’ “web-cafeteria” is a place much more exposed to outside public than traditional cafeteria is. Thus, all discussions and activity in social networks and other online platforms is considered to be under constant magnifying loupe. In general, it is challenging to place clear limits in social media without crossing the legal line because there is a always an amount of uncertainty, even when reviewing the NLRB rules and putting the company policies in respective accordance. Also, the NLRB’s rulings are subject to review by federal appellate courts, which have the final say on whether a particular social media policy is legal or not. Interestingly enough, the new policies only apply to private employers and NLRB itself, being a federal agency, is not subject to its own rules. The statute does not provide remedy for managers and supervisors either, since it is aimed at employees that potentially will organize and seek to improve their working conditions. At the same time, there is a bit of uncertainty about the recess appointment made by President Obama in January of 2012, since they deemed unconstitutional by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit when Noel Canning– a Washington based canning and bottling employer that was not happy with the ruling on when Teamsters Local 760 filed a complaint and NLRA (expectedly) sided with the union. The delicate part of the process is that this decision undermines credibility of all NLRB rulings after January 4th of 2012 after President Obama appointed three new members to the Board. The Solicitor General has just filed a petition for certiorari, asking the Supreme Court to review the D.C. Circuit’s decision. The Supreme Court will most probably not announce its decision as to whether to grant review until after the summer recess.…...

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Social Media Policies

...Social Media Policies Bobbi McGuire DeVry University Question 1: In my search for an article containing lawsuits involving employee posts on social media networks, I was quite surprised to learn how much of problem this has become. According to Melanie Trottman (2011) of the Wall Street Journal, employees that have been severely disciplined or terminated due to their activities on social media websites have been retaliating by use of the National Labor Relations Act of 1935. This law provides employees that work in private-sectors the right to voice their opinion in regards to employment conditions, such as pay and safety. The National Labor Relations Board is the organization that has the final say when determining whether or not an employee has a valid complaint. If the employee’s complaint is found to be valid the NLRB will file a civil complaint against the employer on behalf of the employee. In these cases the complaint is then heard by a NLRB judge who suggests a solution to the employee’s complaint. One lawsuit Trottman provided that caught my interest involved a paramedic from Connecticut that was fired for calling her employer a “scumbag” on her home computer’s Facebook page. As stated by Trottman this was the NLRB’s “first ever involving a firing related to social media” (Trottman, 2011). The findings of the NLRB were that the employee was wrongfully terminated, because the employee made the comment to other employees about the actions of their......

Words: 1100 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Labor Relations

...RUNNING HEAD: LABOR RELATIONS COURSE PROJECT PAPER Sudie Foday HRM 330 Labor Relations Devry University Professor Ellison Abstract This paper addresses the following labor union issues, as it relates to both the United States and its Global counterparts: The changes that are needed for unions to maintain support from their membership, the community, and the employers within organizations. The Decline in labor union membership and political influence and the influence of politics in membership decline. The continued influence of generational aspects on the labor unions by Baby Boomers, as well as Generation X, and Generation Y. Also some other external dynamics that are affecting labor unions such as the impact on union strategies by the global workforce, the past, present evolution of the unions. And will conclude with considerations for the labor unions to remain active and viable organizations in the 21st century. Labor Relations Course Project Paper There are changes are needed for unions to maintain support from their membership, the community, and the employers. The recommendations I would make to union and management leadership in order to meet the demands of a constantly changing workplace, would be that in order to reach the more professional labor market, unions must remove the blue-collar mentality and appeal to more contemporary workers. Unions must determine how to organize 21st-century industries. In the market...

Words: 3556 - Pages: 15

Premium Essay

Labor Relations

...orLabor Unions: Aging Dinosaur or Sleeping Giant? The Labor Movement and Unionism Background and Brief History Higher wages! Shorter workdays! Better working conditions! These famous words echoed throughout the United States beginning in 1790 with the skilled craftsmen (Dessler, 1997, p. 544). For the last two-hundred years, workers of all trades have been fighting for their rights and seeking methods of improving their living standards, working conditions, and job security (Boone, 1996,p.287). As time went by, these individuals came to the conclusion that if they work together collectively, they would grow stronger to get responses to their demands. This inspired into what we know today as labor unions. A labor union is an organized group of workers whose purpose is to increase wages and influence other job conditions for its members (Parkin, 1998,p.344). These labor unions can be divided into two types: craft unions and industrial unions (World, 1998). A craft union is a union whose membership is restricted to workers who possess an identifiable skill (Robinson, 1985,p. 69). These members tend to be better educated and trained, and more unified because of common interests (World, 1998). An example of a craft union is the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (World, 1998). On the other hand, an industrialized union is a group of workers who have a variety of skills and job types but work for the same industry (Parkin, 1998, p. 344). Unions of this type......

Words: 10568 - Pages: 43

Premium Essay

Labor Relations

...Labor Relations Labor relations can refer generally to any association between workers and management about employment circumstances. Most frequently, labor relations refers to dealings involving a workforce that is already unionized and management, or has the potential to become unionized. Labor relations are vital to organizations. The National Labor Relations Act was passed in the 1930s, which gave workers the right to bargain collectively and form unions in the United States (http://www.investorglossary.com/labor-relations.htm). To begin to understand the contributions of unions and their effects on organizations, we must first determine what unions are and what their role has been in labor relations and the nation’s organizations. Labor unions are groups formed by laborers who share a certain characteristics. Characteristics such as the industry, the type of work they do, and who agree that the union will act as their spokesperson or negotiator in all matters dealing with employment involving the employees and their respective employers. By forming unions, employees individually are able to work concurrently to negotiate with their employers to promote every member of the union. The course of bargaining for mutually beneficial benefits or agreements, and the communication between employees and their employers during that process and after that process, are what forms the basis of labor relations. Labor relations cover all aspects of an organization and of......

Words: 3438 - Pages: 14

Premium Essay

The Role of Social Media in Public Relations

...changed in the online world with the introduction of new media, in particular the explosion of social media. This has not only changed how people interact and communicate with each other, it has also had a massive effect on how consumers interact with organisations and businesses. With this in mind, public relations practitioners must now consider how to engage their audience whilst embracing social media as part of an integrated public relations strategy. The term “social media” commonly refers to online social networking sites and blogs and has been proclaimed as leading a universal change that allows instantaneous worldwide, connected communication (Weaver Lariscy et al., 2009, p.314). Where traditional public relations methods such as press releases and statements, can be viewed as being structured and more of a scripted and guarded approach (Anonymous, 2010, p.1), social media has the ability to facilitate a more open engagement method tailored for the target audience, which can be effectively implemented within a multi faceted approach to gain rapid momentum for the organisation as it grows and evolves. Ultimately social media can be the element of a public relations strategy that ‘cuts to the chase’ and delivers the desired messaging to the audience and engages by provided an opportunity for two-way communication and a forum for public opinion, both good and bad (Hudson, 2010, pp.210-1). With this in mind, social media tactics must be aligned with the......

Words: 902 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Labor Relations

...1. Labor relations are generally defined as relations between management and workers. They are also called industrial relations. Workers or group of workers are represented by trade unions. Labor relations may take place on different levels such as regional, national, international. The main challenge for such relation is ability to adapt to emerging changes. The world and technology develops very fast, so do relations between workers and management. Trade unions (also called) labor unions are organizations of workers who united to defend their rights, solving problems in the industry such as wages, working hours, bonuses, Union represent workers and negotiate with the management on behalf of the workers (Jochem, 2000). Such relations are usually accompanied by tensions and conflicts and company owners usually want to earn more and pay less. Workers are willing to work in better conditions for a better salary. Labor unionism in the United States is an expression of the American democratic spirit working itself out in industry is hardly to be doubted. Its beginnings coincided with the period when the free colonies were establishing state governments, and the principles of the federal Constitution were subjects of great political debate. It developed stretch in Jefferson's administration, and grew to a full-fledged labor movement during the presidency of Andrew Jackson. Workmen's clubs, unions, were part of the movement of "Republican-Democratic Societies" which marked......

Words: 1124 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Social Media Policies: Are They Legal?

...Keara Ingram HRM 410 Week 2 Assignment Social Media Policies: Are They Legal? 1. The articles that I found online were named “10 people who learned social media can get you fired” and “Employee fired from Taco Bell for licking shells”. Both articles were related, in the matter that they discussed the termination of employees all over for representing the company in which they worked for improperly and in fact left some disturbing rumors as a result of their conduct at the workplace. The articles discussed that a young man from California was terminated at Taco Bell as crew worker for posting a picture of him on his social media Facebook page of him licking a stack of taco shells. There were several individuals who were outraged by his conduct and the picture itself was shared through Facebook over 2,000 times. His argument was that the shells that he licked were used for testing when the Doritos Locos Tacos were initially introduced on the market and they were going to be thrown out and not consumed by customers. In addition to his own actions, across America there were several other incidents in which triggered consumers all over. One incident occurred at a Kentucky Fried Chicken location where a young lady was exterminated from her job for uploading a picture of her licking a pile of mashed potatoes from the fast food restaurant. Another incident occurred at a Burger King location where a co-worker had taken a picture of his feet inside of two lettuce......

Words: 1092 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Social Media Policies: Are They Legal?

...Article On May 19, 2011, the NLRB had filed a complaint against Hispanics United of Buffalo, Inc. The NLRB ruled that the agency violated the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) when it terminated five employees for “venting” after hours on Facebook about their jobs. The post included one employee’s complaint that a coworker didn’t feel she was working hard enough and another employee’s commiseration that she didn’t “have a life”. The NLRB stated that ““Employees have a protected right to discuss matters affecting their employment amongst themselves,” and it was “irrelevant … that the [employees] were not trying to change their working conditions and that they did not communicate their concerns to Hispanics United.” The agency was ordered to reinstate the fired employees with full back pay. Employers should ensure that their social media and internet policies do not facially violate the NLRA by prohibiting employee discussions of working conditions. And, while employers can still prohibit misuse of social media - including for the dissemination of trade secrets or confidential and proprietary information, trade libel, defamation, or harassment - employers must scrupulously avoid violating the NLRA by disciplining employees for legitimate, online discussions of working conditions. Agreeing with the NLRB’s decision I agree with NLRB’s decision. The agency – Hispanics United of Buffalo should have taken other measures in consideration, opposed to terminating the employees,......

Words: 564 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Social Media Policy

...Social Media Policy Social Media pertains to user-created audio, video, text or multimedia works that are shared in an electronic environment, such as Facebook, Twitter, email, personal blogs or instant messages. In as such, the policy of our company is that employees may use Social Media for their personal use while off the clock and in compliance with our company’s terms related to Social Media. Please note that conduct that is illegal or in direct violation of the company’s policy on Social Media will still be deemed a violation of policy or illegal if it occurs online. Employees are entitled to express their opinions and ideas, but have a responsibility not to violate the company’s policies or negatively reflect on the organization. When communicating online employees should never speak on behalf of the company or about the company without prior authorization from management or marketing, or hold a position that has been approved to speak on behalf of the company. The company reserves the right to restrict and monitor employee’s use of social media. The employee should remember to: Be respectful; Be authentic and always state your name; Be careful and protect your personal information; Be responsible and act with integrity. The employee should never disclose confidential information. The employee should never disclose patient information. The employee should never disclose personnel information. The employee should never disclose legal information. The employee......

Words: 312 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Hr Labor Employee Relations

...representation would add anything for our customers, our employees, or our shareholders. We just do not believe it’s productive and adds value.” Using information from chapter 6, evaluate this position. Target has built a reputation of being a high end discounted retail store that caters towards the urban trendsetting families. When a consumer hears the name of Target Stores, the association with low wages or anti-union statements typical do not come to mind. The statement made by CEO Bob Ulrich and the company’s antiunion philosophy is a common feeling most organization have towards unions. The company is entitled to have such viewpoints and has the authority to express them freely as long as the company does not participate in unfair labor practices that will intimidate an employee’s legal right of inquiring into unions. Target has a right to be vocal about the organization’s stance and sway employees not to join a union. The biggest reason for employees to form unions is collectively, “employees feel their employer is treating them unfairly and a union can change that (Mitchell & Simpson, 2009). In fact, employers have greater supremacy to improve workplace conditions sooner, then employees implementing a union. As organizations continues to increase employee benefits such as work-life balance, competitive pay, along with the comprehensive study of employee engagement, the employer diminishes the thought of employees understanding the need of union......

Words: 1704 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

Environmental Sustainability & Social Media Relations

...Evaluation of UHV's Social Media Movement  Social media can either be a fantastic tool for a business, or a mediocre attempt at  keeping up with the times.  If content is interesting and managed well, frequently updated and  easy to access, social media is a fantastic way to connect with the community and send a  message.  It also allows a company to move away from a mentality of just trying to make a sale,  when a connections is made via facebook or twitter, it becomes more than just about the product,  its a way to get to know the company or the personalities of the people that they put in charge of  their social networking sites.  It’s also becoming a way for companies to address concerns  directly with their consumer, to also be available and able to accurately portray a company  image.  UHV actually goes a step further than most companies who are utilizing social media.  UHV connect is a fantastic tool that most companies haven’t gone the extra mile to implement.  This is most likely because of the target audience.  Because it is a university, and to most college  age people, social media is “all the rage” it’s important for a college to put forth the extra effort  to participate.  UHV connect goes a step beyond facebook or twitter and includes just about  everything that a student would need to know.  The career section is especially helpful for  seniors or new graduates trying to get a foot in the door to the workforce.  UHV successfully ......

Words: 892 - Pages: 4

Free Essay

Social Media Policies: Are They Legal

...Case Study Week 2: Social Media Polices: Are They Legal? Keisha Rivera DeVry University MGMT 410 Professor Miller Case Study Week 2: Social Media Policies: Are They Legal? The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is part of the United States government. It is an independent agency that is in charge of holding elections to represent the labor union, and also investigates and remedies the unfair labor practices (National Labors Relations Board, n.d.). Many companies have policies set into play regarding the restriction of social media usage while on company property. Many organizations are afraid that if an employee is utilizing social media accounts while at work that they may be posting negative comments about the organization. This will give the company a bad name. NLRB Facebook Firing An employee fro a Connecticut company had posted certain negative comments about a supervisor on their personal Facebook account. The employee was fired after posting about her supervisor, calling him a “scumbag”. Under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), employees are allowed to criticize the company as well as the leaders on social media. “Employers that set social media policies that prohibit or attempt to prohibit such activity can be in violation” (Northway, 2011, para. 6). Decision I agree with the decision of the NLRB to pursue this case. The company was clearly in the wrong by firing the employee for the remarks she made on her personal Facebook account. ......

Words: 889 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Labor Relations

...Chapter 01 Contemporary Labor Relations: Objectives, Practices, and Challenges Answer Key     True / False Questions   1. (p. 4) Fundamentally, a labor union is a group of workers who join together to influence the nature of their employment.  TRUE   Difficulty: Easy   2. (p. 4) The widening gap between the richest and poorest individuals in the U.S. is in part due to the weakened position of labor unions.  TRUE   Difficulty: Easy   3. (p. 5) When an employer uses an employee suggestion box to gather ideas and concerns from its employees, it is primarily addressing the labor relations goal of efficiency.  FALSE   Difficulty: Moderate   4. (p. 5) The goals of efficiency, equity, and voice in the workplace rarely conflict with one another.  FALSE   Difficulty: Easy   5. (p. 6) A key role of unions is to negotiate work rules and practices that ensure fair treatment of employees by their managers and employers.  TRUE   Difficulty: Easy   6. (p. 6-7) In the United States, employees have broad protections against arbitrary dismissal such that employers must provide a good, business related reason for firing someone.  FALSE   Difficulty: Moderate   7. (p. 6) The official policy of the Unites States is to protect workers’ rights to act together for mutual aid and protection in the workplace and to promote collective bargaining as a way to resolve workplace conflict. TRUE Difficulty: Moderate 8. (p. 7) In the U.S., workers can......

Words: 5176 - Pages: 21

Premium Essay

Labor Relations

...MG420 DL Labor Relations Research Assignment (Your name) (Date of submission) Instructor’s Name February 21, 2016 1. Define the term “collective bargaining” and list and describe four issues that are mandatory components of collective bargaining agreement. Collective bargaining is the act of negotiating employment conditions such as wages and roles between the employer and the employees. I researched collective bargaining and Funk & Wagnails New World Encyclopedia states, “The bargaining process is concerned with wages, working hours, fringe benefits, job security, and other matters relating to working conditions.”(2015) There are four issues that are mandatory components of collective bargaining agreement. The first issue is compensation. Compensation includes wages, fringe benefits, vacations, and holidays, shift premiums, and profit sharing. The second issue is personnel, policies, and procedures, which are layoffs, promotion, transfer policies, overtime, and vacation rules. The third issue is employee rights and responsibilities such as seniority rights, job standards, and workplace rules. Employer rights and responsibilities is the fourth issue and that includes management rights, just cause discipline and discharge subcontracting , and safety standards. Collective bargaining is needed and happening all over the world. An example of current events/acts of collective bargaining is what’s going on is Wisconsin right now. Wisconsin’s governor Scott Walker......

Words: 1940 - Pages: 8

Free Essay

National Labor Relations Board

...National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) A few days ago, there was a vote on a controversial policy to permit changing workplace election rules regarding votes on union representation. The proposed rule at issue was the shortening of the amount of time between a union filing a petition to hold an election for union representation and the actual vote. While the vote was heavily favored by union and labor lobbyists, it was opposed by most business groups. Because most employers do not hear about the vote until they are notified by the NLRB, the shortening of the amount of time between the petition and the actual vote is very important. Each side has many important actions to take prior to an election. In terms of the union organizers, there is much that they need to do prior to the election. Before the vote can even happen, the union must collect authorization cards from 30 percent of the employees (saying they agree to be in a union). The union must then file a petition with the NLRB who becomes the referee in the process. Once this is done, the employer is notified to address any issues raised by the petition, such as the legitimacy of the petition signatures, which employees to include in the proposed bargaining unit, and so forth. The union must then prove there is an adequate showing of interest for the union (usually done with authorization cards). This is the most important thing the union must do before an election. If the union cannot gather enough interest from......

Words: 1409 - Pages: 6