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Tudors

In: Historical Events

Submitted By DanieJaimes
Words 391
Pages 2
Daniela Jaimes Saucedo
OPVL

Enrique XVIII, El Rey y la corte de los Tudor.

Origen:
La escritora de este libro es una especialista en el campo y es de nacionalidad Britanica por lo que el origen de esta fuente es de valor
Propósito:
El propósito del libro es mostrar una clara, extensa y acertada visión de lo que fue el reinado de Enrique VIII en una forma cronológica. Esto es de valor ya que el libro proporciona detalles importantes sobre el arte, religión, moda, sociedad y vida diaria de aquella apoca en la corte.
Valor:
Esta es una fuente de valor ya que el autor es experto en ese de campo de la historia de Inglaterra. Hizo sus estudios en “City of London” y posteriormente empezó a ensañar Historia en “Civil Service” antes de escribir su primer libro. Entre sus más famosos trabajos están: “Las seis esposas de Enrique VIII”, “Eleanor de Aquitaine” y “The Lady Elizabeth”
Limitación:
Su limitación es tal vez que no podemos encontrar fuentes primarias de aquella época ya que no existían sin embargo en mi opinión su origen no limita su valor ya que la escritora es de origen Británico y especializada en el tema.

The Tudors (Serie de Televisión)

Origen:
El productor no era un experto en el tema, sin embrago se contrataron a varios historiadores expertos en el campo, de todas formas el origen limita su valor ya que algunos hechos fueron cambiados.
Propósito:
El propósito de la serie era entretener a la audiencia pero también dar a conocer los hechos y la historia del reinado de Enrique XVIII y su corte.
Valor:
Esta fuente es de valor ya que en la serie se puede ver de manera muy clara el estilo de vida que se tenía en ese entonces en la corte, además nos da detalles importantes sobre la manera de pensar y actuar de Enrique VIII y por quien estaba influenciado. La serie nos deja ver el periodo posterior y durante el reinado de este monarca.
Limitación:
El origen de esta fuente si limita su valor ya que el mismo productor anuncio que algunas cosas fueron cambiadas para poder realizar la seria a manera de “novela” y entretener a la audiencia. Algunos eventos difieren de que lo que en realidad sucedió, como: nombres, relaciones, algunos vestuarios y físico de los personajes…...

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